Creating Reports in ATLAS.ti Web

Create and export diverse reports of your data in the reports manager to examine code distributions and frequencies across your documents

Using reports to query your data

ATLAS.ti Web has a special section dedicated to generating and exporting reports. In the reports page, you can visually explore the frequencies of your codes and how they are distributed throughout your documents. In other words, once you have coded your data, you can query and retrieve your results in the reports page. A great benefit of ATLAS.ti Web's reports is that you can save multiple reports to capture different queries. Thus, you could save a report view for each research question you may be interested in, easily edit any report in the future if you wish, and, most crucially, these saved report views will automatically update as you continue coding your data to reflect the corresponding results.

Code distribution reports show how many data quotations are associated with each code, and the code-document table displays frequencies of codes across documents. Thus, you can use code distribution reports to explore how the data linked to each code, and you can use code-document tables to examine where in your data the different codes are appearing.

Access the reports page by clicking on the reports icon in the left-hand toolbar (see below). Then, click on “+ Create report” to create a new report.

Code distribution reports

You can choose whether you would like to create a code distribution chart or a code-document table. A code distribution chart displays all the codes in descending order of their frequency (i.e., the codes with the most associated quotations appear first). Below the chart, you can see all of the data quotations. By clicking on any code in the chart, ATLAS.ti Web will filter the quotations below to only show quotations that are associated to your selected code(s).

You can choose whether you would like to view the results as a bar chart, donut chart, or tree map. You could save a screenshot of the graphic if you would like to include the image in research reports or presentations. The resulting quotations can be downloaded as an Excel report. 

A powerful way to query your data is to apply filter rules. Click on the “Filter Quotations” button (in the upper righthand corner), and then you can select the information by which you want to filter the quotations. You can filter by the content of quotations (e.g., the text a quotation contains), by document name (e.g., quotations that come from a particular document), by document group (e.g., quotations that come from documents in a particular group), by code (e.g., quotations associated to a particular code), by code group (e.g., quotations that are associated with codes from a particular group), by comment (e.g., the content of a quotation’s comment), and by creator (e.g., which team member created the quotations).

You can add as many filter rules as you would like. For example, if we wanted to see what top leaders thought about the benefits of using a web-based software, we could set the filters for the document groups that contains all data coming from the CEO and Business Manager, and another filter for the code group that contains all the codes about benefits of using a web-based software

You can also edit the name and comment of this chart view by clicking on the “information” button at the top of the screen. The comment space of the report view offers a perfect space to note down your research question (or the purpose for which you created this report view).

You can also choose how you want to sort the resulting quotations by clicking on the "Sort by" button (located directly above the list of quotations). Finally, you can save the report to your computer by clicking on the “Download” button (located directly above the list of quotations). This will generate an Excel spreadsheet of the data quotations, their associated codes and comments, and the document from which each quotation comes.

Code-document table

In addition to examining code distributions, you can construct code-document tables to explore code frequencies across your documents. In other words, the code-document table lets you see where in your project the different codes are being used.

From the code-document table, you can add codes, code groups, documents, and/or document groups. For example, if we wanted to compare which benefits were mentioned by male and female participants, we could select the individual codes on benefits. Then, we can select the document groups for male and female participants.

The code-document table then shows how many times each code was used across all the data from male and female participants, providing a helpful global overview and permitting comparisons across the data. With this tool, you can construct tables that show the frequencies of your codes and/or code groups, so you can see how many times a certain code (or code group) was used in a particular document (or document group). As always, ATLAS.ti also keeps you close to the data: Click on any cell in the table to view the quotations behind the numbers.

You can also edit the name and comment of this table by clicking on the “information” button at the top of the screen. The comment space of the report view offers a perfect space to note down your research question (or the purpose for which you created this report view).

You can also choose how you want to sort the resulting quotations by clicking on the "Sort by" button (located directly above the list of quotations). Finally, you can save the report to your computer by clicking on the “Download” button (located directly above the list of quotations). This will generate an Excel spreadsheet of the data quotations, their associated codes and comments, and the document from which each quotation comes.